M.C. Escher: "Relativity," 1953

M.C. Escher (1898-1972) was a Dutch graphic artist best known for his art which depicted spatial illusions, impossible buildings, and repeating geometric patterns. One of his most-famous art works is "Relativity," 1953 (pictured below), which at first glance seems like a normal interior, yet upon closer examination, it's an impossible situation. Scroll down for more ...


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Why is it an impossible picture? There are conflicting points of view, and what appears to be three different gravitational directions. Looking at it straight on, you see the person at the bottom center climbing the stairs. But if you rotate the image clockwise or counter-clockwise, there are characters who would also be "upright" in those directions as well, so it would be impossible for this scenario to actually exist.

Relativity, by M.C. Escher

It's a fun picture to study and examine, but then we've found something that's also really cool - an artist named Nico Roig from Barcelona (Spain) has created a 3-D interactive version of this image.

Here's four screen shots from Roig's tribute to M.C. Escher's Relativity - you can click on any of the images to go to Roig's fully-immersive panorama with CGI effects. I want to give you the sneak preview here with these still images, but you have to click through and go experience the real deal (make sure to click on the full-screen option - that's especially cool). He even has a VR version, if you have the proper goggles to see it correctly.

3D version of M.C. Escher's Relativity, by Nico Roig

3D version of M.C. Escher's Relativity, by Nico Roig

3D version of M.C. Escher's Relativity, by Nico Roig

3D version of M.C. Escher's Relativity, by Nico Roig

Nico Roig studied industrial design and specialized in 3D and CG imaging. He experiments mainly in three areas: stereoscopy, high-dynamic range imaging and 360 degree panoramas. You can see more of his interactive panoramas here.




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